Frozen Shoulder - stretches & exercises to treat and "thaw" your frozen shoulder!

How to Thaw Out Your Frozen Shoulder

What if one day you woke up and you weren’t able to lift your arm above your head? No matter how hard you tried, it just won’t move.

 

And to make matters worse, your shoulder is swollen and you’re in a lot of pain.

 

These are just a few of many symptoms of a condition commonly known as Frozen Shoulder. As the medical folk like to call it — Adhesive Capsulitis. (See, that’s why most people prefer to just say ‘frozen shoulder’!)

 

Frozen Shoulder is a condition in which the shoulder joint experiences an extremely limited range of motion. In some severe cases, an individual with the condition will have difficulty performing basic daily tasks like getting dressed or brushing their teeth.

What is the cause of Frozen Shoulder?

The main cause of Frozen Shoulder is inflammation directly in the shoulder joint. The joint can become inflamed after an injury, illness or even chest or breast surgery.

 

Although Frozen Shoulder can happen to anyone, it is most common among middle-aged women and those with Diabetes or arthritis.

 

And now for some good news (‘cause we don’t get enough of that these days)…

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SI joint pain | Why your pelvis has everything to do with your chronic low back pain

SI Joint Pain and a Wiggly Pelvis: Could This Be The Cause of Your Low Back Pain Too?

I recently had a new client in my clinic who was experiencing pain in her lower back. “Lisa” had just leaned down to pick up her toddler son, turned to grab something and…BOOM. The searing pain stopped her in her tracks.

 

She immediately gave me a call so we could start treating the problem and she could get back to her busy life.

 

After a few evaluations, I was able to determine the cause of the problem: SI Joint Dysfunction caused by Pelvic Girdle Instability.

So, my pelvis is wiggly?!

In simple terms, Lisa’s pelvis moves all over the place when she walks and therefore is unable to support her lower back and torso. And Lisa is not alone in this.

 

An unstable Pelvic Girdle (just think wiggly pelvis) is extremely common, especially among women who have given birth OR are currently pregnant — AND HERE’S WHY…

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Functional Movement - lunge

Is ‘Functional Movement’ Just Another Trendy Term? (or should you be doing it?!)

We’ve only got one body — so why not treat it well in everything we do, including moving it?

 

When we walk, run, play sports, lift weights, or just sit in front of the computer (umm, all day, every day), we should be tuning in to how we use our muscles — for optimal functioning in healthy, efficient and pain-free movement.

 

Consider this: if any part of your body is experiencing pain, it’s pretty likely that some element of your body’s functional movement system (which I refer to as myofascial slings) has been compromised.

 

This may manifest as:

  • weakness/decreased strength
  • muscle imbalance
  • poor functioning joint
  • decreased flexibility

 

And it doesn’t matter whether one or more of these show up in your ankles, hips, pelvis, knees, back, shoulders, neck or the classic “pain in the butt”…the whole body has been cleverly designed like a complex chain link system that works for you to move with biomechanical efficiency.

 

(At least that’s the idea!)

 

That’s why the term ‘functional movement’ – which I prefer to expand that to holistic and functional movement isn’t just a trendy exercise term du jour.

 

It’s a body movement concept that everyone needs in their everyday repertoire!

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What are triggers points and myofascial pain syndrome?

Trigger Points & Myofascial Pain Syndrome

TRIGGER POINTS (TrP’s) are actually very common and can occur within any muscle of the body. Patients of mine who have trigger points often report persistent, chronic pain that results in a decreased range of motion of that particular muscle.

 

The most common muscles affected are in the head and neck area, which can lead to symptoms such as headaches, jaw pain, ringing in the ear(s), and even eye pain.

 

“The daily clinical experience of thousands of massage therapists, physical therapists, and physicians strongly indicates that most of our common aches and pains — and many other puzzling physical complaints are actually caused by trigger points, or small contraction knots, in the muscles of the body.” ~ Clair Davies

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The language of pain - what chronic pain and discomfort is signalling to your body

The Language of Pain – What Chronic Pain is Telling Your Body

Did you know your body communicates with you around the clock?

 

Many of us are often too busy and stressed with everyday responsibilities, like work and childcare, or distracted with television and technology, to recognise and receive the messages our bodies are sending us.

 

But, you can gain valuable insight into your current state of health when you tune into what your body has to say.

The Language of Pain…are you listening to your body’s signals?

One of the most common languages our body uses to communicate with us — is PAIN.

 

The International Association for the Study of Pain defines it as, “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage”.

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What Does Posture Have To Do With Mental Health?

What Does Posture Have to Do With My Mental Health?

“The human body is the best picture of the human soul.” – Ludwig Wittgenstein

 

Here’s what Social Psychologist, Amy Cuddy had to say about this in her 2012 TedTalk “Your Body Language May Shape Who You Are”

“Body language affects how others see us, but it may also change how we see ourselves. Power posing — that is, standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident — can boost feelings of confidence, and might have an impact on our chances for success.”

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How does fascia function in the body?

What the Fascia?!

In terms of physical anatomy, we’re all likely very familiar with the skeletal system, circulatory system, immune system, digestive system as well as muscles, tendons and ligaments.

But, what if I told you that an entire body system (that affects virtually every other system) – has been left off that list?!

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